Comment

Misconceptions of Entrepreneurship - Miriam Hamburger

This is a video that addresses some of the many misconceptions about entrepreneurship. While most people think entrepreneurs (and even the members of Oxypreneurship) always have a business plan and a strict method, the reality is that we're just making it up as we go along. It's not about who you know and cutting corners to get to where you need to be. It's about understanding your own abilities and using what you have to make something new. 

One widely held misconception is that entrepreneurs should keep their ideas to themselves to avoid someone stealing their idea. Entrepreneurs never work alone. A success story will never involve one person sitting in their dorm room suddenly receiving checks for millions of dollars for a product they created by themselves. Entrepreneurship is an exchange. In order for it to be successful, it must grow through differing perspectives, whether that's from potential buyers, members in a team, or someone with a similar idea.

Entrepreneurs have the reputation of being hard headed and high strung, when in actuality, entrepreneurs must be flexible and relaxed. The most successful entrepreneurs make more mistakes than successful projects, and understand that concept. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8gRkJ9cnzo

Get ready to change your perspective.

Comment

The New Global Language – Kenny Tran

Comment

The New Global Language – Kenny Tran

Think of an entrepreneur, almost any entrepreneur, and you’ll probably develop an image of someone doing business in your city, state/province, or country. Rarely is an entrepreneur ready to do business around the world from day one. But as I have discovered, entrepreneurs with particular talents and ambition are increasingly looking to sell their products around the world. No stay-at-homes, this new breed of entrepreneur is “born global.”

As an international student from South East Asia who is crazy about business and social enterprise, I knew I was fit for this whole global entrepreneurial movement. But how to start? I really needed something like the Global Startup Youth (GSY), a satellite event of Global Entrepreneur Summit. Perfect timing! It was an amazing event. Being placed on the spot with 500 youths from 105 countries, I felt a sense of belonging. It was where I wanted to be. It was also the one place that would set me forward in unprecedented ways. Meeting all these people around the world made me realize one thing: PEOPLE CARE! The trend, movement, and attention have shifted towards youth entrepreneurship. And the high caliber entrepreneurs at GSY have validated my point.

While they, without exception, argued for the critical role of English as the international language of business, they invariably spoke several languages and had multiple cultural competencies. They were often immigrants creating new businesses in a new country or else they had lived substantial periods abroad and were bringing their international competence and connections back to their home country. Ironically, their knowledge of international business and the way they approach their business relationships made international opportunities less risky for them than simply serving the local market. Combined with the existence of strong local competitors in their domestic market, or the small size of their domestic market, this international orientation made global activity more feasible than more traditional domestic entrepreneurship.

Not only does entrepreneurship enhance economic growth and improve quality of life, it has also become the global language of our generation. Embrace the energy, take action now!

Comment

The 30 Second Pitch - Cholpon Ramizova

Comment

The 30 Second Pitch - Cholpon Ramizova

A limited amount of time is given to you to sell your idea or product. Your words must be chosen carefully, your speech meticulously timed, your expressions and gestures on point. The buzzer signals the end of your speech, and a sense of relief or doubt washes over you- but hey, it's all over, right?
Such is the nature of the "30-second pitch", a nerve-wracking, but necessary part of starting a business.

But how to go about crafting a pitch that has both content and punch? Former Emmy-award winning journalist and communications coach Carmine Gallo tells us to ask ourselves four basic questions:

1. What is my service, product, company, or cause?
2. What problem do I solve?
3. How am I different?
4. Why should you care?

Answering these four simple questions can give your pitch some direction to take your project to a marketable level. Consider them as you start your next entrepreneurial venture. Until then, wishing you an idea-filled week!

http://www.businessweek.com/stories/2005-05-03/mastering-the-30-second-pitch

-Cholpon Ramizova

Comment

Bring Something Valuable to the Table - Arun Chadda

1 Comment

Bring Something Valuable to the Table - Arun Chadda

This week Kenny the leader of the incubator team asked me to give a presentation to the team about the basics of writing a business plan. Because I am a freshman and joined the group less than 2 months ago I was nervous about what I was going to say and more importantly whether or not people going to take a presentation seriously. I have three years experience writing business plans in high school but to have upper classman’s interested about these experiences was unimaginable. While presenting to the whole team they were listening and interested in what I had to say. After giving the speech I realized that my age and my time in the organization did not matter what did was that I had something of value to say. I think I can apply this to many other aspects of my life. Bringing something of value not only makes your peers respect you it gives you a platform to share your ideas. When assessing if I want to join a club or organization not only am I going to ask myself what can I learn from this club but also what I can bring to the club or organization. 

Have a blessed week,

Arun Chadda

 

1 Comment

Getting the Ball Rolling - Valdair Lopes

Comment

Getting the Ball Rolling - Valdair Lopes

Hello, for those who may or may not be aware I spent this past week in Malaysia at the Global Startup Youth, which was a side event of this year’s Global Entrepreneurship Summit. It was an amazing event and experience that I learned a lot from but for the sake of this blog post I will keep it to two. First, that I need a business card! Secondly, my networking ability sucks.

    I was partially kidding about the first part. As a college student, I don’t necessarily believe that I need a business card; because I don’t own a business. My occupation, like many other kids my age, is to be a college student. That being said, it wouldn’t hurt to have a card that contains contact information and maybe the clubs that are either a chair or participate of. At events such as GSY, you may not have enough time to whip out your phone and get that person’s contact information. So for the sake of being fast and efficient I may get a pale nimbus with raised lettering business card (American Psycho reference anyone?).

    Personally, I am not an extrovert or very good at keeping a casual conversation. That is why I thought it would be next to impossible to get myself to approach any of the prominent guest speakers or other individuals with an amazing accomplishments. Although the conversations didn’t happen right off the bat, they did eventually did end up happening and I was able to exchange my contact with them. I would attribute my ‘success’ to two things: my ability to connect to them personally and my eagerness.

    An easy way I found to get the ball rolling in a conversation was to resolve the conversation about a shared interest. With many of the prominent people I approached I already knew about their personal achievements and background. This makes it easy to be ‘starstruck’ in their presence and ask questions that you can easily find on Google. My most meaningful conversations were the ones about passionate topics. Just one question about coding to Orion Henry, the founder of Heroku, led to a ten minute enthusiastic breakdown of the pros and cons of all coding language. I developed a bond with the individuals that I spoke to that saw I was more interested in them as a person rather than their achievements. This leads me to my second point.

    Individuals who see that you are genuinely interested in what they do and see that you are passionate about something that they can relate to are more willing to help you out. I am personally all over the place when it comes to things that I am passionate about. I can’t pinpoint one thing that drives me but I am a firm believer in learning as much as possible because it may benefit me in the future. One question that I found myself asking a lot of people was ‘What are you working on now?’ I may not have necessarily been interested in pursuing whatever they told me but I took it upon myself to probe and learn more. But if it was I made sure to tell them that it was up my alley. I was surprised about how willing these people were to give advice. To me that was a testament to their humility. Disclaimer, keep in mind that not everyone is the same, so this may not hold true for everyone you speak to.

I am signing off now. I hope you found this the least bit helpful. Be sure to continue to read all the Oxypreneurship blog post! Thanks!

Comment

GSY: The First of Its Kind - Shilpa Bhongir

Comment

GSY: The First of Its Kind - Shilpa Bhongir

                  This past week, I had the privilege of spending time with 500 of the most excited, enthusiastic and energetic young entrepreneurs, nine incredibly talented Oxy students, and one fearless and inspiring Professor.

                  I’ve traveled in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia with ten other Oxypreneurship leaders and students from Professor Khagram’s DWA/Econ 151 course: Entrepreneurial Leadership in the 21st century. We worked as Student Ambassadors for Global Startup Youth (GSY), a summit bringing 500 young entrepreneurs together to solve some of the world’s most pressing issues in the areas of education, health, environment and female empowerment. The students formed teams to build a working prototype of a mobile application that could address these issues. The winners of the event presented their application in front of the 4th Annual Global Entrepreneurship Summit, which we also had the privilege to attend. 

                  GSY is the first of its kind. Never before has a government sponsored 500 students (250 Malaysians and 250 students from over 100 countries around the world) to collaborate and work together on important issues of our time. One of the most memorable moments of our trips was when our entire team first walked into the hall that would be hosting the participants for the following three days. Brightly colored bean bags filled the entire room and posters with the now famous multi-colored hexagons hung from the ceilings.  Dash Dhakshinamoorthy the mastermind of the entire event, stood on stage cheering “GSY, GSY!” and students joined him shouting and pumping their fists in the air as they filled the room. It was clear, this was going to be something special.

I met students from Kazakhstan, Morocco, Peru, Moldova, Lithuania – and that’s just the beginning of the list. Witnessing these students form teams and work tirelessly across language and cultural barriers was inspiring and humbling. Despite having flown in from far and wide (I heard stories of over 50 hour plane journeys) and being severely jetlagged, every participant was ready to get to work and contribute to his or her team.

                  In addition to the students, the event brought together amazing speakers and facilitators who have had prolific careers including Christina Brodbeck, one of the original founding members of YouTube, and Orion Henry, founder of Heroku and Roger Dickey, the founder of Mafia Wars.  Despite their success and experience, every facilitator was incredibly down-to-earth and willing to mentor the teams. Being part of such a dynamic environment made achieving any of my goals or ambitions more real.  I’d meet and talk with students and professionals who have already been making their way to their goals. Their drive and tenacity has been infectious, has motivated me to bring new energy to the work that I do and to Oxypreneurship as a whole.

                  Looking back at the last couple days, I’m moved most by the energy that filled the room. Every participant, mentor, speaker and leader brought an enthusiasm and commitment that turned a simple hall with colorful bean bags into a launching pad for cross-cultural connection and innovation that will continue to motivate young entrepreneurs around the world.

Comment

Comment

Entrepreneurial Leadership in the 21st Century

Take the class for 4 units!

 Sign up now for DWA/ECON 151: Entrepreneurial Leadership in the 21st Century. Taught by Prof. Khagram on Tuesday's 7.15-10.15pm (CRN 1757)

The twenty first century has witnessed an explosion of practical interest, research, teaching on entrepreneurship and leadership across sectors of economic, social and political life. Entrepreneurial leadership connects critical thinking to creative problem-solving and solution seeking. The range of models includes technology innovators, social entrepreneurs, policy innovators, non-profit leaders, responsible business managers among others. This course will provide students with a synthetic and multi-disciplinary overview to entrepreneurial leadership at the individual, organizational, and societal levels. Students will engage with the latest thinking, practical case-studies, and guest-entrepreneurs from the social, economic, cultural and political spheres.

Comment